Dedicated to encouraging artistic expression and furthering knowledge of the arts

Judging a Photo

by Ellen Corbitt Ellen presented this to our Photography Club on Feb 13, 2020. To improve our photography skills, it helps to view our work as a judge might. download

Patterns in Photography

by Ellen Corbitt Ellen presented this to our Photography Club on Feb 13, 2020. This is in anticipation of the next VAC Art Exhibit which has “Patterns” as a theme. download

Street Photography

by Bill Riski Bill talked about the rewards and challenges of working with strangers when pursuing street photography. He use a mixture of his photographs and others to illustrate the styles and elements of a good street photo. download

Portrait Photography

by Sandy Morse In talking about this genre of photography, Sandy focused only on taking portraits in natural light; the most relevant situation for most of us in the club. His slides, in PDF format, are available here and viewable below. Wonderful presentation with a mix of photos taken by him, other club members, and from outside sources. (Due to file size limitations in WordPress (this website software), I had to reduce the presentation size, with some resulting loss in photo resolution. If you want to see the photos in all their glory, contact Sandy directly. Bill Riski)

Landscape Photography

by Dick Golobic In talking about this genre of photography, Dick integrated Ellen’s composition guidelines in with his wonderful portfolio of landscapes. His slides, in PDF format, are available here and viewable below. (Give it a minute; it’s a 149MB file). Wonderful presentation with photos from National Parks all over the U.S. (Due to file size limitations in WordPress (this website software), I had to reduce the presentation size, with some resulting loss in photo resolution. If you want to see his photos in all their glory, contact Dick directly. Bill Riski)

Still Life Photography

by Ellen Corbitt Ellen talked about this genre of photography then stepped us through the process of creating a still life photo. Her slides, in PDF format, are available here and viewable below. (Give it a minute; it’s a 30MB file). Wonderful, enlightening presentation with photo examples throughout.

Bird Photography by Sandy Morse

At our February 14th meeting, Sandy used his own photographs to lead us through shooting on Dataw Island. Below is his presentation (in a highly compressed form for website purposes). The full resolution photos he showed us are wonderful.

Black & White Photography by Ellen Corbett

Ellen Corbett gave an excellent presentation this month on the “WHY” of black and white photography. Why might a photo be better in black & white than color? Click on the photo to download a PDF of her presentation. This as followed by Sandy Morse who showed us how to convert a photo into black and white, both in-camera and using Lightroom.   Bill Riski showed a few sets of color and b&w pairs. These illustrated some of the characteristics Ellen talked about that make a black & white photo interesting and dramatic.

Shooting the Super Blood Wolf Moon

I put up the previous post to explain WHAT this events is.  Here’s a post with some good tips for photographing this type of lunar event. This post does not show the photo examples available at the Olympus web site. Check out the full article here… https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/astrophotography/six-tips-for-super-blood-moon-photography SIX TIPS FOR SUPER BLOOD MOON PHOTOGRAPHY | Olympus WHAT IS A BLOOD MOON? On the evening of Sunday, January 20, the first supermoon of 2019 will enter the Earth’s shadow to produce a “blood moon.” Occurring during a lunar eclipse, this is when the moon enters the Earth’s shadow to produce a dramatic moment when the moon turns a reddish color. Check out these tips from Olympus Visionary Alex McClure to prepare yourself for capturing the total lunar eclipse (the last visible in most of North America until 2121), then visit the Olympus User Gallery to post your best #superbloodmoon shots. PLAN AHEAD Pick a shooting location with clear skies. The last thing you want to be is in a place that develops afternoon clouds, so be sure to check the local weather reports. KEEP STEADY Use a tripod! A stable platform is very important when shooting the moon. The longer the lens, the more support and stability is needed. You will have to slow your shutter speed down as the moon gets darker and changes to orange and then red colors. I also like using the Olympus RM-UC1 remote cable release to keep the camera from moving. Editor’s Note: Using the O.I. Share App to remotely trigger compatible cameras will also keep your camera from moving. KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE SETTINGS Monitor and adjust your settings during the different phases of the lunar event. As the moon begins traveling across the night sky, it’s moving at a rapid rate of speed, so you need to start your shooting at around 1/640 second,… Read More